Jun
18
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jun 18 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jun 18 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jun
19
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jun 19 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jun 19 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Jun
20
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jun 20 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jun
22
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Jun 22 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Jun
25
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jun 25 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jun 25 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jun
26
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jun 26 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jun 26 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Jun
27
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jun 27 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jun
29
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Jun 29 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Jul
2
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jul 2 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 2 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
3
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 3 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jul 3 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Jul
4
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 4 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
6
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Jul 6 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Jul
9
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jul 9 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 9 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
10
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 10 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jul 10 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Jul
11
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 11 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
13
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Jul 13 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Jul
16
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jul 16 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 16 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
17
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 17 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jul 17 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Jul
18
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 18 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
20
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Jul 20 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Jul
23
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jul 23 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 23 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
24
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 24 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jul 24 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Jul
25
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 25 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
27
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Jul 27 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Jul
30
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Jul 30 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 30 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Jul
31
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Jul 31 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Jul 31 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Aug
1
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Aug 1 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Aug
3
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Aug 3 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Aug
6
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Aug 6 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Aug 6 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Aug
7
Wed
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Aug 7 @ 09:00 – 10:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll
Aug 7 @ 19:00 – 20:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio.

Aug
8
Thu
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Aug 8 @ 16:00 – 17:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Aug
10
Sat
Classic Music Hour with Pat O’Carroll (Repeat)
Aug 10 @ 12:00 – 13:00

Pat plays popular pieces of classical music on Corinium Radio – Another chance to hear this week’s show.

Aug
13
Tue
Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical…
Aug 13 @ 06:30 – 07:30

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug

Corinium Classics: Yes, there’s much more to classical… (Repeat)
Aug 13 @ 21:00 – 22:00

Presented by Andrew Hodges, our Cirencester-based composer, violinist and coach, this latest programme asks the question: “Why do classical music audiences like their composers dead?”

Classical concert audiences almost invariable prefer to hear composers of the past. Pop concert audiences like to hear their favourite songs by their favourite artists. They are commonly played by the band that composed them, and if played by a cover band, the original music creators are usually still very much alive.

Yes, a little nostalgia goes a long way but how did it come to be that the music in classical concerts is often 200, 300 or even 400 or more years old? Conversely, put a ‘modern’ piece into a classical concert programme and they will often frown and maybe not even turn up!

Did you know that classical audiences of the 18th century would expect to hear to the latest thing from composers such as Bach, Haydn, and Mozart when they were very much alive? Two hundred and fifty years later, what’s changed? Nothing. Classical audiences still want to hear Bach, Haydn, and Mozart.

In this programme Andrew Hodges talks about how it came to be that classical concert programmes are now often more than 90% music of the past. Oh, and he names the 19th century composer behind it all!

AND… Here’s a HEADS UP for a live concert of Andrew’s compositions & arrangements on July 7th in Nailsworth.  Be prepared to be wowed by Andrew’s string orchestra Stratton Sinfonietta, playing The Beatles, Morrecone and Vivaldi plus 2 pieces for solo violin and string orchestra by Andrew himself, with the unique addition of MUSIC VIDEO especially created for this concert!

More info here – https://www.cirencesterviolin.co.uk/strattonsinfonietta

Today’s “Corinium Classics”, presented by Andrew Hodges, is a musical mix of the past and the present with a distinctly classical flavour.  Andrew’s aim is to make classical music much more accessible to everyone. There’s more about it here on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeZ4ymCygug